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Ogden dress

MAKES PATTERNMAKING SEWING TUTORIALS

OGDEN CAMI DRESS HACK

September 13, 2016

I am so excited about all of the Ogden hacks that I have seen popping up over the past few weeks. I guess that is the beauty of a simple pattern isn’t it? So many possibilites. Here are a few of my fav hacks that I have seen so far –  here, here and here.

I put together a very simple Ogden hack for today where essentially you add a large gathered rectangle to a baby doll type silhouette. It’s very easy and it completely transforms the pattern.

The first thing we are going to do is shorten the cami front and back. I am assuming that if you are making this hack then you already have made this original pattern. If so, try it on and decide where you want the end of the bodice to be and the skirt portion to begin. When I tried mine on, I decided on about 10 inches down from the center V. Then I added 1/2″ to both the neckline and bottom for seam allowance so the total drop at center front was 11 inches. Now mimic the basic shape of the original hem for this new hem at the shortened length.

Line the side seams up of the front and back cami to make sure that they are the same length and make a new cutting line for the back cami just like you did for the front. Note that the back is going to be straighter than the front. The front needs the more curved hemline to accomodate the fullness of your chest.

Now cut along the lines you made.

Cut out two front camis and two back camis on the fold, and your straps. You will not be using the lining pattern pieces from the original cami pattern. This dress will have a fully lined bodice so one of the fronts and one backs will be your lining.

You also need to cut out your skirt pieces. You are going to cut out two identical rectangles. Decide how long you want the skirt and add 1/2″ for the top seam allowance and 1″ for the hem. Cut it according to your preference. I wanted a 26″ skirt so with the seam allowance and hem mine was 27 1/2″ long.

For the width it also depends on how full you want yours (and how wide your fabric is). For reference mine is 43″ wide so I cut it at 44″ wide because of the 1/2″ seam allowance on both sides. So in the end, I cut two rectangles that were 27 1/2″ tall and 44″ wide.

Once everything is cut out you can start sewing. You are going to sew the top portion of the cami up exactly like the instructions except do not hem the outer cami or the lining. It should look like this.

Next, sew the two rectangles together (right sides together) along the side seams at 1/2″ seam allowance and finish in your desired manner. I serged it to keep it simple, but french seams would be a great choice if you want the whole inside of the dress to be perfectly finished.

Now you are going to run two parallel gathering stitches along the top of the skirt. It’s easiest to do two on the front and two on the back, stopping and starting right before and after the side seams.

Gather up the stitches so that the gathering is evenly distributed and the top of the skirt is the same width as the bottom of the cami. With right sides touching, pin the skirt to the main cami (keep the lining up and out of the way). Stitch at 1/2″ seam allowance and press all seam allowances up towards the cami.

Separate your lining and press the bottom up (wrong sides touching) by 3/8″.

Bring the lining down towards the skirt and pin the folded edge over the seam where the skirt and main cami meet. You will be completely covering the seam allowance. Pin generously.

On the right side of the dress, stitch in the ditch at the seam where the cami and skirt meet, catching the lining underneath.

Try the dress on the make sure that you like the length and adjust as necessary. Fold the bottom up by 1/4″ and again at 3/4″. Press and Pin and stitch the hem in place.  That’s it.

Here is my version. I decided to make this one middie length although I really want to make another one that is above the knee. I wore this dress this weekend to the farmers market with flats and a jean jacket and it was perfect. I love everything about it.

 

Here it is without a belt. As you can see it is kinda a baby doll shape. I love it this way as well, and I think when I make a shorter one I will wear it without the belt more often.

 

That’s it. If you still need the Ogden cami pattern you can purchase it here. Let me know if you have any questions.

MAKES SEWING TUTORIALS

ROSCOE DRESS BEACH COVERUP

March 21, 2018

 

 

I have been wanting to use the Roscoe Dress sewing pattern to make a swim coverup for a long time. I decided to make it happen for Roscoe Month and found this perfect cotton/nylon crochet fabric from the Fabric Store. I love that it has the see through, floral look that you find with lace in general, but this feels a bit more casual and everyday because it’s cotton and geometric. I noticed that they have a few other colors as well – white, maroon, and cobalt blue.

 

 

 

 

For the purposes of this photoshoot, I layered the dress over a black Ogden cami that I lengthened into a slip dress. I think I will wear it this way quite a bit actually and I love that I can wear it for everyday or over a swimsuit for traveling.

 

 

Because of the fabric being crochet and having holes in it, I made a few changes. For the parts of the dress that need more fine tuned sewing, I used a black rayon fabric instead of the lace fabric for those areas such as the neckband, neck ties, and neck facing. For the hem and ruffle I also played around with the fabric. I knew that the hem would be tricky so I turned my pattern pieces and cut the hem along the selvage so I wouldn’t actually have the hem it. I also sewed the raw edges of the ruffle on the outside of the fabric instead of the inside. I like the way that ended up looking. Because lace generally doesn’t fray, this is a perfect time to use the seam allowance as a design detail.

 

 

Just a reminder that the Roscoe is on sale thru the end of the month with the code ROSCOEMONTH. I have three more versions of the Roscoe to show you before the end of the month so be prepared for that.

PATTERNMAKING SEWING

INTRODUCING THE NIKKO TOP AND DRESS SEWING PATTERN

February 5, 2018

I am so excited to introduce the newest True Bias sewing pattern, the Nikko Top and Dress. The Nikko is a mockneck knit pattern with four views. Views A and B are tops with a fitted silhouette that is perfect paired with high waisted pants (like the Landers) and skirts. Views B and C are ankle length dresses with a straighter fit through the waist and hips and side slits from the hem to the knee.

I have found the my Nikko tops have been my go to with winter layering. With lots of coverage but a slimmer fit, they are perfect under chunky cardigans and vests or tighter fitting jackets. It’s my winter tshirt. View A is sleeveless. The cut is similar to a racerback, but with just enough coverage to wear a regular bra. This view is especially great for transitional weather. View B is a long sleeved mock turtleneck. This is probably my most worn of all of my Nikkos. A simple black or striped long sleeved Nikko is perfect for almost any occasion. I love it with jeans for everyday, or tucked into a fitted short skirt with thick tights for something a bit more dressed up.

I love to wear my dress length Nikko with ankle booties and my leather jacket, although it’s also great with a maxi cardigan and a statement necklace. It fits with some ease in the waist and hips for some added comfort. It is not a body con dress. It’s flattering while still being easy to wear and move in.

The Nikko is an advanced beginner pattern. It’s super quick to make (think a tshirt without the difficult neckline) with the hardest part being hemming the knits. I suggest using some kind of knit hem tape such as HeatnBond soft stretch to make it easier, but we will go over that more during the sewalong. Fabrics for this pattern are knits with about 75% stretch. If you use fabric with less stretch than this you will have a hard time getting it over your head (I know from experience). I have found that my favorite fabric to use for the top is a bamboo knit. For the dress length I like a fabric that’s a bit less clingy so a rib knit is perfect for this. It has tons of stretch and recovery with the added thickness and coverage that the ribbing brings.

The Nikko Top and Dress is being released today as both a pdf and a paper pattern. You can find them both in my shop. I am also releasing the Ogden cami as a paper pattern today which you can find here.

I will be back during the next couple of weeks with ready-to-wear inspiration and also fabric recommendations. The official sewalong will begin in two weeks on Monday Feb. 19th.

I hope you love it as much as I do.

MAKES SEWING

INDIESEW BLOG TOUR + HIGHLANDS WRAP DRESS

April 25, 2017

Today I am lucky enough to be part of the Indiesew Spring Summer 2017 Collection blog tour. I eagerly jumped at the chance to sew up the Highlands wrap dress by Allie Olson of Indiesew. Wrap dresses are such a flattering cut on all body types and with it’s long waist ties and high side slits, the Highlands dress feels like a modern take on a classic dress.

I knew that I wanted to make this up in black, so I went with my current favorite fabric to sew with – rayon crepe from The Fabric Store online. If you havn’t sewn with rayon crepe before, imagine all of the benefits of a rayon challis – flows nicely, easy to sew, affordable, washable –  but then add in a really nice texture to the fabric that makes it feel a little bit more upscale. It also has a bit more weight to it which is beautiful in maxi length dresses because it adds some extra drama when you walk. I also have this fabric in a maroon that I am planning to make a Ogden dress out of once I can find the time.

The dress bodice fit perfect straight from the pattern. The only change I made was to shorten it. I think I took a total of 7 inches off of the skirt to accomodate the fact that I am a few inches shorter than the intended model and I wanted to wear it with flats instead of heels. After wearing it for the photoshoot I think I will add a small sew in snap to keep the neckline closed as it seems to pull open on me as I wear it.

Man I love this dress. One of those perfect dresses that I could see wearing to a dress event with a statement necklace and heels ( I could even see this as a killer bridesmaid dress) or worn with flats and a cuff bracelet it is an awesome dress to wear for brunch or a date night.

You can follow along with the rest of the lovely ladies on Indiesew Spring/Summer 2017 Collection Blog Tour here :

April 17: Hey June

April 18: Threadbear Garments

April 19: Alina Sewing + Design Co.

April 20: Groovy Baby and Mama

April 21: The Sara Project

April 24: Ada Spragg

April 25: True Bias

April 26: Ginger Peach Studio

April 27: Sew MarieFleur

April 28: Cookin’ and Craftin’

 

SEWING FOR KIDS TUTORIALS

MINI ODGEN DRESS HACK

March 21, 2017

The Ogden Cami is a great template for hacks, and I am especially loving the idea of dress hacks right now for summer. I did a babydoll hack last year that you can find here. Today I am going to show you how to create a super simple elastic waist dress using the Mini Ogden cami. You can of coarse use basically the same steps to create a version in the women’s size as well. I ended up making two of these dresses in order to get the steps right. The top one is made from a thrifted table cloth and the bottom one is some really pretty cotton that I ordered from My Fabric Designs (I didn’t design it though). I love the handpainted design so much. Both dresses are lined with some cheap light pink gingham from JoAnns.

For this project you are going to need your main dress fabric, lining fabric, and extra elastic (in addition to the elastic for the back of the cami) for the waistline.

First print off your pattern and assemble pattern pieces 1 (front cami), 2 (back cami), 4 (strap), and the elastic cutting guide. You will not be needing the pattern piece for the front lining as the entire dress will be lined instead.

For for the front and back cami we need to add length for the bottom of the dress. Take your front pattern piece and tape the bottom along a large piece of paper. Your center front fold line should line up with the left edge of the paper as shown below. Determine how long you want your dress to be. After comparing to other dresses, I decided that I wanted it to be about 24″ along the center front line. This allows for a couple of inches of wiggle room in case I need to adjust the hem at the end. To get the desired length I figured out that I would need to add about 10.5 inches to the bottom of the cami.

Simply mark your desired length around the entire hem so that your new hem mimicks the shape of the bottom of the cami. For the side seam of the dress, draw a straight line extending down from the last few inches of the cami. The side seam and hem need to meet up at a 90 degree angle at the CF and side seam. Repeat these steps for the back as well, adding the exact same amount to the bottom of the back cami as you did for the front.

Line up the notches on the side of your front and back pattern pieces. Trim off the extra height on the back piece (since we are assembling the dress a bit differently than the cami we don’t need the extra height).

 

Cut out a front, back, and straps from your main fabric. Cut out a front and back from your lining. The lining pieces should be identical to your main pieces, except trim 1/2″ off of the bottom of both of your lining pieces. Having your lining pieces slightly shorter will assure that it does not peek out once the dress is finished.

Go ahead and assemble according to steps 1-3 of the Mini Ogden instructions.

Sew up the side seams of the main dress and also the dress lining. Finish the seam allowances in your desired manner (I serged them) and press them either open or to one side depending on the finish you choose. Pin the lining to the main dress along the entire neckline, with right sides touching. Stitch together, trim and snip the seam allowance.

Flip the lining to the inside of the dress so that the wrong side of the dress is now touching the wrong side of the lining. Press along the neckline with the straps extending upwards in the front.

To create the casing for the elastic in the back, make a line of stitching through both the dress and lining 1/2″ below the top edge from one side seam to another, backstitching on both ends.

Take your elastic, cut to the specified length, attach one end to a safety pin and insert it into the casing you just created between the lining and dress.

With a bit of elastic extending past each side seam, stitch through all layers (including the elastic) to secure.

Attach the back end of the shoulder straps as described in the instructions in steps 13-14.

Figure out where you want the waistband to hit. The easiest way to do this is to try the dress on recipient, and wrap the elastic around the the child’s waist where it seems most comfortable. Using a disappearing marker or chalk, mark the top edge of where you want to have the elastic on all sides.

Make a row of stitching around the entire dress through both the dress and lining where you marked it.

Make another row of stitching 1/2″ below the first row, leaving a 2 inch gap at center back to insert the waistband elastic.

Cut your elastic to the appropriate length plus a bit extra for seam allowance. You will need to figure out the appropriate length by measuring it on the child you are making it for.

Attach one end to a safety pin and insert the elastic in between the lining and dress thru the opening at center back and around the entire waistband casing you created. Sew the elastic ends together and sew up the opening you left at center back.

Hem the dress like instructed to in Step 15. Hem the lining in the same way.

Give the dress a final press and you are done!

I love how this turned out so much, that I want to do the same hack on a summer Ogden dress for myself. I am thinking black for something that I will wear all of the time. I hope I can find the time to do it.

Let me know if you have any questions.