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MAKES SEWING TUTORIALS

ROSCOE DRESS BEACH COVERUP

March 21, 2018

 

 

I have been wanting to use the Roscoe Dress sewing pattern to make a swim coverup for a long time. I decided to make it happen for Roscoe Month and found this perfect cotton/nylon crochet fabric from the Fabric Store. I love that it has the see through, floral look that you find with lace in general, but this feels a bit more casual and everyday because it’s cotton and geometric. I noticed that they have a few other colors as well – white, maroon, and cobalt blue.

 

 

 

 

For the purposes of this photoshoot, I layered the dress over a black Ogden cami that I lengthened into a slip dress. I think I will wear it this way quite a bit actually and I love that I can wear it for everyday or over a swimsuit for traveling.

 

 

Because of the fabric being crochet and having holes in it, I made a few changes. For the parts of the dress that need more fine tuned sewing, I used a black rayon fabric instead of the lace fabric for those areas such as the neckband, neck ties, and neck facing. For the hem and ruffle I also played around with the fabric. I knew that the hem would be tricky so I turned my pattern pieces and cut the hem along the selvage so I wouldn’t actually have the hem it. I also sewed the raw edges of the ruffle on the outside of the fabric instead of the inside. I like the way that ended up looking. Because lace generally doesn’t fray, this is a perfect time to use the seam allowance as a design detail.

 

 

Just a reminder that the Roscoe is on sale thru the end of the month with the code ROSCOEMONTH. I have three more versions of the Roscoe to show you before the end of the month so be prepared for that.

MAKES SEWING TUTORIALS

LANDER SUSPENDER HACK

February 12, 2018

 

I am so excited to share this super simple and super fun hack for the Lander pant pattern with you today. The best part about this hack is that you can add it to your existing Landers for one look and remove the straps to wear them as the original pants when you prefer.

The fabric for these Landers is from the Fabric Store in LA. It’s a navy twill that is just the perfect weight and structure for these pants. I am almost always drawn to black fabric, but for these pants I absolutely love changing it up to navy. It has more of that 70s vibe that I am into right now. I am wearing the Landers with a Nikko (view B) in a cream baby rib knit from JoAnns.

I don’t have step by step photos as this is so simple, but I will talk you through how I did it.

First I cut four long strips of fabric and interfaced each one so they wouldn’t stretch out. I wanted the finished suspenders to each be 35.5″ long and 1.5″ wide, so with seam allowance each strip was 36.5″ long and 2.5″ wide. This is of coarse personal preference. You will need to decide how long you want yours. I recommend sewing it longer than you think because you can always shorten them.

With right sides touching, sew two strips together leaving an opening to turn it right side out. Trim corners, and turn right side out. Repeat for second suspender.

Give it a good press making sure that all corners are sharp. Edgestitch around the outside of each suspender, closing up the opening you left at the same time.

With your finished Landers on, pin your suspenders so that they attach in the front and back where you want them to. I decided to have my front ones hit at the top of the pockets. In the back I crossed them and had them end about 3 inches out from center back on each side.

Now you need to sew buttonholes in each end of your suspenders and then hand sew the coordinating buttons to the inside waistband in the four spots your chose. Make sure that you don’t sew through your entire waistband or you will see the stitching on the outside. One tip I have is to choose very flat buttons so that you do not feel them on your waist when wearing it.

And that is it. Super simple and fun. I wore this outfit to a baby shower on Sunday and could not have felt more chic. You can find the Lander sewing pattern here and the Nikko pattern here. I hope you give it a try!

 

SEWALONG SEWING TUTORIALS

LANDER SEWALONG DAY 5 – WAISTBAND / BUTTONS / HEM

September 22, 2017

Welcome back for the last day of the Lander sewalong. I am so excited to finish these up and see all of your versions. Let’s get started.

 

Step 20 – First thing we are going to do is baste the side seams and check for fit. To create a basting stitch, all you need to do is lengthen your stitch length as far as it goes so that it’s easy to unpick if need be.

Flip the back pant around so that the right side of the back and right side of the front are touching. Line up the side seams and pin.

Baste at a 1” seam allowance. The 1″ seam allowance gives you lots of wiggle room in case you need to let it out a bit around the hip etc…

Try the pants on, and adjust as necessary. Make sure that you pin the fly closed when you try them on to get an accurate idea of fit once the buttons are on. You may also want to try them on inside out so that you can easily pin the areas you want to adjust. (The seam allowance at the waist must stay at 1” so that the waistband will match up correctly, but you can tweak around the hips to get a perfect fit.) If you find that you need more room in the waist you will need to cut a new waistband. If you want to take it in at the waist you can make due, although your notches will not match up and you will need to trim some off of center front.

Return your stitch length to normal. Stitch each outside side seam. If necessary, unpick any visible basting stitches.

Trim the seam allowances down to 1/2”. Finish the seam allowances together in your desired manner ( I’m serging) and press towards the back pant or short. Turn the whole garment right side out.

 

Step 21 – Fold the long edges of the belt loop piece together, right sides touching. Sew along the long edge at 1/2” seam allowance.

Trim the seam allowance to 1/8”.

Using a loop turner or safety pin, turn the tube right side out. Press the tube flat so that the seam is along the center back.

Edgestitch at 1/8” along both sides. Cut the tube into 5 equal 3 1/2″ sections. Discard any extra.

Step 22 – With the right side of the belt loop touching the right side of your pant or short, pin one raw edge flush against the top edge.

One should be centered over the center back seam, the next two centered over the side seams, and the last two flush with the inside edge of the front pockets. Baste the belt loops to hold them in place.

 

Step 23 – Press the unnotched long edge of the waistband up by 3/8”, wrong sides touching.

With 1/2” hanging off of the center front edges and right sides touching, pin the notched side of the waistband to the top of the pant / short. The notches on the waistband will match up with the notches on the front pant / short, the sideseams, and center back.

 

Step 24 – Starting at the left center front edge, stitch around the whole waistband, ending at the right center front edge. If you get a little pinch in your fabric like I did below, unpick that area and then ease it back in. This can easily happen since the waistband is stabilized with interfacing and the pant which isn’t may grow a bit with sewing.

Grade the seams to reduce bulk. To do this, trim the pant seam allowance to 1/4″ and the waistband seam allowance to 3/8″.

 

Step 25 – Press the whole waistband up and away from the main pant, and over the seam allowance.

 

Step 26 – Take the folded edge of the waistband and pull it down (right sides touching) towards the waistband seam along the right center front so that it overlaps it by about 1/16”. Pin.

Stitch at 1/2” seam allowance so that it is flush with the fly. Repeat for left side and clip corners.

 

Step 27 – Flip the waistband right side out. On the inside waistband, make sure that folded edge covers the seam by about 1/16” and pin in place. Press the whole waistband so that you get a nice squared edge at each center front corner.

 

Step 28 – On the front of the pant, stitch in the ditch in the seam between the main pant / short and the waistband, catching the edge of the folded waistband on the inside of the garment. The goal is that this stitching is virtually invisible since it is hidden in the joining of at seam. If you don’t catch the inside waistband for small amounts, don’t worry as you will be edgestitching in the next step which will catch it.

outside

inside

 

Step 29 – Starting at center back, edgestitch at 1/8” around the entire perimeter of the waistband, pivoting at each corner.

Step 30 – Stitch on top of each belt loop 1/4” below the waistband seam. You want this stitching to be secure so stitch back and forth a few times.

Press the belt loop upwards.

Fold the top down by about 1/2” so that it is flush with the top of the waistband. Press and pin.

Stitch back and forth a few times, about 1/8” from the top, to secure.

 

Step 31 – Sew the buttonhole on the waistband according to the marking on your waistband pattern piece. If you have some, use fray check at this time to reinforce your buttonholes.

Open all four of your buttonholes. If you don’t have a buttonhole opener you may have a hard time opening them since there are so many layers. You might want to consider getting one in the future if you think you will be sewing a lot of pants or jeans. It makes life so much easier. Although I have also heard that razor blade and a steady hand do wonders in a pinch.

 

Step 32 – With your fly lined up, use a disappearing pen or similar tool to mark your buttonhole placement through your cut buttonholes. The marking should be on the inside (closest to center front) edge of your buttonhole.

Attach your buttons to the right fly and right waistband accordingly. If you are using jeans buttons and this is your first time, don’t fret. It’s easier than you think. Use a sharp object like an awl to poke a hole.

Put the male end of the button through the back of the hole and then place the female part on top of that.

Turn it upside down onto a hard surface and use a hammer to hit the back of the button so that it secures it in to the front section. You can kind pull on the button to make sure that it is attached, but you can usually feel it securing.

 

Step 33 – Fold the bottom raw edge of the pant or short up by 1/4”, wrong sides touching, and press.

For the shorts, fold up by another 1”. For the pants, fold up by another 3”. Because there is such a wide hem, this is a good place to try on the pants and adjust the length a bit. Pin and press.

Topstitch at 7/8” for the shorts and 2 7/8” for the pants.

 

That’s it, you are finished! Give the whole thing a final press and wear them proudly. I will take photos of mine and post them on the blog next week. Please tag me if you post yours so I see them. You can use the tags #landerpant #landershort and #truebias.

 

If you have any questions or comments, please comment below or send me an email. Thank you for sewing along!

SEWALONG SEWING TUTORIALS

LANDER SEWALONG DAY 4 – CROTCH AND FLY

September 21, 2017

Welcome back for more sewing today with the Lander Sewalong. Today we are going to tackle the crotch and also the fly. If you have sewn normal zipper fly before, I think you will love trying this button fly. It’s much easier. If you have never sewn a fly before all, this is a really good first one to start on.

 

Step 11 – First we are going to finish the seam allowances of each of the inner legs separately. I am going to serge them. They have to be done separately now so that they can be pressed open once stitched. Otherwise you will end up with a lot of bulk right at the bottom of your crotch which just isn’t comfy.( I accidentally serged the crotches first. Don’t do that. You can do that in step 12. Ooops.)

Pin one front to the coordinating back along the inner leg, right sides together. Stitch at your normal 1/2″ seam allowance. For Views B and C, you may find that the distance between the crotch and first notch is a bit longer on the back leg than the front, if so,  you will need to stretch it slightly to fit.

Press seam allowances open. Repeat for other leg.

 

Step 12 – Finish the seam allowances of the right and left crotch separately.

Pin the left leg to the right leg along the crotch seam with right sides touching. Starting at center back and backstitching, stitch until you get to the dot on center front. Backstitch at dot to secure.

 

Step 13 – Finish the outside curved edge of the left fly with either a zig zag stitch or serger.

With right sides touching, pin the straight edge of the left fly to the center front edge of the left short or pant. Let the back pant and right front fall down and out of the way during this step. I like to put one pin right at the dot to help me know where to stop stitching.

Stitch from the top down to the dot and stop, backstitching. It’s better to stop one or two stitches short, than to stitch too far. If you go too far and catch the right side, you will need to unpick. If you stop a bit too short, there will be more topstitching and such to secure that area in the next few steps so don’t worry too much.

Grade the seam you just stitched by trimming the seam allowance of the interfaced fly to reduce bulk.

 

Step 14 – Flip the left fly to the inside of the left front and press.

Fold in the seam allowance of the bottom section of the fly that was not stitched and press.

 

Step 15 – With your pant right side out, place the stitching guide provided with your pattern pieces on the left fly.

Mark along the outside edge for the curved topstitching and transfer the markings for the buttonholes.

Starting at the top of the pant, sew the curved topstitching down the left fly, backstitching at the end.

Next, stitch the buttonholes.

Turn your garment inside out and clip the seam allowance of the right front crotch curve 1/2” below the dot.

 

Step 16 – Fold the right fly in half with right sides touching. Sew along the bottom angled edge.

Clip the corner and trim the seam allowance.

Turn right side out and press.

Finish the long open edge with a zigzag stitch or serger.

 

Step 17 – Like you did for the left side, pin the right fly to the right front. Let the left side and back fall down and out of the way.

Stitch from the waistline down until the dot. Backstitch to secure. Just like the left fly, it’s better to be a few stitches too short than too long. Make sure that you are not catching the edge of the left fly in the process.

Flip the right fly to the inside of the short or pant.

 

Step 18 – Press the seam allowances below the clip towards the left pant. I like to use a tailor’s ham to help get all of the seam allowances on the crotch towards the left leg without making any creases.

Topstitch at 1/8” through all layers from the right side, starting at the dot, backstitching, and ending at the top back waistline.

 

Step 19 – Pin the fly so that everything is laying flat and lined up. To help secure the fly, sew a small (about 1/2” long) bartack through all layers at the bottom of the curved stitching and another at an angle just below the first buttonhole. I like a zigzag width of about 2.5mm and length of about 0.2mm for my bartacks, but that is preference. You may want to try a few on some scrap fabric to figure out your preference.

 

That’s it for today. Tomorrow we will completely finish our pants and shorts which includes sideseams, waistband, hemming, and buttons.

SEWING FOR KIDS TUTORIALS

EMERSON PANT HACK

June 13, 2017

As much as I love the Emerson pattern as shorts and crop pants, it works really great as a full length pant as well. And with just a few easy hacks it’s really simple to do. The best part of it is that when my daughter gets too tall for these I can just hem them into the original length of crop pants or shorts to get more wear out of them. The pants above are just a simple wide length pant, which my daughter loves. I used a zebra print crepe fabric that you can find here. It’s a fun print and the fact that the fabric has great drape really works well for the wide leg style.

And the pants above are more of a genie style by adding elastic to the ankle. I think they turned out really fun in this denim chambray, although I think next time I will try them in something softer for a more subtle affect.

You are going to need to cut your pant leg pattern pieces longer than the original crop pants. For my daughter I added about 8 inches which included the 1 inch for the elastic, 1/4″ for turn under, and 1/4″ for wiggle room. (So that’s 1 1/2″ for the elastic casing and 6 1/2″ for length.

For both styles, after sewing up the pattern as instruction except for the hem, you are going to turn your pants inside out. Press the bottom up by 1/4″

Now press the whole thing up by about 1 1/4″. If you are making the wide leg pant them just stitch along the fold now to finish the hem. If making the genie version, leave a 2 inch opening to insert the elastic.

If you are doing the genie pant, cut two pieces of elastic to the length desired (wrap it around your child’s ankle and add some for overlap and easy). Attach a safely pin to one end and insert the elastic through the opening.

Sew the two ends of the elastic together, stitch up the opening and you are done!

Your pants should look something like these. Let me know if you have any questions.