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MAKES TUTORIALS

SHELBY LACE BACK HACK

July 3, 2019

I wanted to share a really fun and easy hack for the Shelby dress and Romper. The lace up trend is back in a big way and the Shelby seemed like the perfect pattern to use to try it out.

I am going to be sewing up the dress version but shortening it a bit for more of a middi length. If you decide to go for a middi length in this pattern I do recommend shortening the long views instead of lengthening the short views since the longer views have a bit less width to keep normal fabric widths into account. If you simply lengthen the shorter views the circumference of your pattern pieces will get quite large at the bottom and make them hard to cut out.

For fabric I am using some beautiful rayon challis gifted to me from the online Fabric Store. As of when I am writing this it is still in stock and you can find it here. I love rayon challis for the Shelby because of it’s great drape and this fun print is large scale which is hard to find.

The first thing to take into account when cutting out your Shelby is that your ties will be one long tie instead of two. You simply place the pattern piece on a fold at the short end and cut out one long tie. Sew it up according to the normal instructions.

Next, you need to cut out two strips of fabric which will become your loops. Cut two 1.25″ x 18″ strips of fabric.

With right sides touching, sew them up with a 3/8″ seam allowance.

Trim the seam allowance to about 1/8″ and turn right side out using a loop turner or small safety pin.

Press your tubes flat.

Get your center back piece. I am sewing up a dress view so it’s on the fold but if you are sewing up a romper view, make sure it is already sewn up along the center back.

You should already have one set of markings for the original tie placement. We are going to use those markings and add two more sets above the original. You could add more if you wanted.

I decided to place my markings for loop placement 2 1/2″ apart. You can have them closer or further according to your preference.

These markings are for the center points of your loops. Make another set of markings 1 inch out from the cut edge, at each loop marking. This second marking is for the turn of each loop should hit.

Pin generously so that the tube is centered over the markings with about 1/4″ on each side and turning at the second 1″ marking.

Once you feel confident that they all evenly looped, baste in place at 1/2″ seam allowance.

If all still looks good, sew the side back to the center back, sandwiching the loops inbetween.

Trim loop seam allowance.

Finish seam allowance in your desired manner and press seam allowances towards side back.

Repeat for other side until you have matching loops on both sides.

To lace up the loops, pull the long tie through the loops so that it is centered along the top two loops.

Continue to lace it up just like a sneaker and tie in a bow at the bottom.

Sew the rest of the garment up according to your instructions.

I love how mine turned out! You can find the Shelby pattern here.

ON MY MIND OTHER TUTORIALS

FABRIC STASH ORGANIZATION

July 1, 2019

Last week I talked on instagram stories about my stash and my unsuccessful attempt at organizing it. For years I have been folding and storing all of my stash fabric (which I embarassingly have way too much of) in bins tucked under my cutting table. The problem is that although it was nice and safe in there, I never remembered what I had so I would buy more and more. I also couldn’t easily locate fabric when I needed it. Enough was enough so I decided to take everything out of my bins, organize it, donate the fabric I was never going to sew, (I was able to donate it to my local library for their creative space) and get all of the stash fabric organized onto shelves. I started using the rolling method because I had heard it was easier to see your fabric, but as I kept going I realized it was way too messy for my liking.

They I shared it on instagram and a bunch of you replied that you used the comic board method. I had never heard of this method before so I went to youtube where I found this great instructional video from Sew Sweetness. I was immediately hooked and decided to change my methods. The only issue I anticipated was that all of the tutorials I found were geared towards quilting and therefore 44 inch wide stable cotton fabrics. Most of my stash consists of 54-60 inch wide apparel fabrics. Some of them are super thick, others are slippery, and most are in 2-5 yard cuts. So I wanted bigger boards right off the bat.

Instead of the smaller comic book boards, I went with these 8.5 x 11 inch magazine boards. This little bit of extra size gives just enough extra room to help with my wider fabric. They also happened to fit the height of my Ikea shelves better. This is definitely something I would consider when choosing the size of the boards you use. Magazine boards are kinda like a thick cardstock, pretty inexpensive, and most importantly are acid free. This is something I would highly recommend thinking about because you do not want the cardboard you are using to damage your fabric if it stays on there for a long time.

I also ordered these clear plastic alligator clips which come in a big package and are pretty cheap. I do wish that they had bigger ones for the thicker fabrics in my stash and I am still on the lookout for those. So far I have only found metal ones that are bigger and I don’t feel comfortable using metal on my fabric in case it rusts. I know a lot of shops also use T pins which are a great option if you are not worried about rust or the pin damaging your fabric. I decided to stick with the clear plastic ones and make them work.

Now that you know what I am using, here is the step by step of how I folded my fabric. Keep in mind that I am no perfectionist when it comes to folding these. I always wash and dry my fabric right after buying it so I am left with some wrinkly fabric and frayed ends. This doesn’t bother me at all. You could certainly go the extra mile and iron your fabric before folding but personally I think this makes the whole process too long and more of a hassle. That’s just me though.

For this demo I am using 2 yards of denim that is 60 inches wide. For each cut of fabric you need one board and two alligator clips.

Start by folding your fabric lengthwise with selvages touching. I choose to have the right side of the fabric out so that it’s easier to see the fabric for what it is on the shelf, but that is up to you.

Take your magazine board and place it in the middle of the fabric between the selvages and the fold and about 5 inches in from the cut edge.

Fold down the top selvage edges over the magazine board. Make sure to continue the fold all of the way down the length of the fabric (2 yards in my case). This can get a little tricky if you have more yardage. On my rayons when I had 4 yards I folded the whole thing in half widthwise so it was like I was dealing with 2 yards wide.

Fold up the bottom folded edge over the magazine board. Make sure to continue the fold all of the way down the length of the fabric (2 yards in my case).

Fold in the 5 inches to the left of the magazine board.

Flip the magazine board with the fabric over and over until you get close to the end of your yardage. Keep it nice and tight.

Fold in the cut edges at the end of your yardage so that they are not hanging out.

Now fold this last fold in so that everything is nice and neat.

Take your alligator clips and slide them into the second two layers of fabric up against the last fold you made. This will hold your fabric tight on the roll without having to expand the small alligator clip too much.

That is it! I am so excited about how nice and neat it looks.

They stack perfectly on my shelf and keep it looking tidy, while still allowing me to see all of my fabric. I love it so much.

Folding all of my stash only took a few hours, cost about $30 US and was weirdly relaxing. I am hooked. It is how I plan to organize my fabric stash from here on out. I hope this was helpful for you as well.

Some of the links above are affiliate links which means that at no additional cost to you, I receive a commission if you click through and make a purchase. All opinions are honest and my own.

DIY TUTORIALS

DENIM BLEACHING & DISTRESSING EXPERIMENTS

April 29, 2019

After putting together some summer sewing plans, I decided that I really wanted to play around with bleaching and distressing denim in order to achieve the perfect worn in look for a pair of 70s inspired Landers and a Closet Case Patterns Fiona Dress. I wasn’t really sure where to start, but after digging deep into pinterest I finally found two great blog posts that I relied heavily on (Megan Nielsen and Alina Design Co.). I ended up combining them along with some trial and error for my own method, but I do recommend checking them both out if you want to give this a try for yourself.

I started with three different types of Denim from my stash. Because they were from my stash I am not certain on the weights, colors, brands etc… of the denims, but they are all stretch denims and two were cone mills. I was interested to see how the spandex would be affected by the bleach but also knew that I wanted the clothing made from these to have some stretch recovery so I stuck with them. Before I go any deeper I should say that every denim reacted differently and so I do not recommend you going forward with bleaching an item without first doing a test like this one. It’s simple and worth the experiment.

MARK YOUR DENIM

The first thing you need to do is mark each of your swatches. You will be surprised how hard it is to differentiate between the denims once they are in the bleach bath so it is very important that you mark them all with a permanent marker on the back. Be sure to have one swatch for each denim type that is the original, meaning that it will not go in the bath at all, so you have something to compare it to.

I wrote some initials to give me an idea of which denim it was, along with how long that swatch would be in the bath. So, each denim had an original swatch and one for 15 min, 30 min, 45 min, 1 hr, and 2 hrs.

I also decided to sew a few seams in some. If I were being more thorough I would have sewn seams in all of them, but I was being a bit lazy so I just did it on the 15 min and 1 hr swatches for each type of denim. I wanted to see how the bleach took to the seam edge and also wanted to play around with the seam later during distressing.

BLEACH BATH

Unfortunately I forgot to take pictures of this part, but it’s easy enough to explain. I used a 4:1 ratio of water to bleach so that I could replicate it easily on a larger scale once I do my bigger ones down the road. So for me this meant 16 cups of water and 4 cups of bleach stirred up into a large plastic bin. I grabbed a spoon that I could ruin and kept a timer close and went to work.

I dropped them all in at the same time and tried to stir them all for the first 15 minutes. I wasn’t as vigilant after that. The first thing that I noticed right away is that some of the swatches wanted to roll up. I think next time I would wet them all first which I am hoping would help with that. I ended up getting a few uneven spots as a result of the rolling. If I had gloves on I probably could have done a better job of getting them flat though.

One thing to note is that the water began to get pretty yellow pretty fast. I have been told that it has something to do with the spandex in the fabric so consider yourself warned.

Once the first 15 min. time went off I pulled out the three 15 min swatches and plunged them into a big bucket of water. Then I just continued the timer until all were done.

As soon as they were all out of the bath I put them into a washer with detergent and ran a cycle. Then I dried them all on high. Here is what I ended up with (The top one is the original and then its 15 min, 30 min, 45 min, 1 hr, and 2 hrs) :

I find it interesting that almost all of the change happened within the first 30 min. If I were to do it again I would probably do 5 or 10 min increments instead of 15 for the first 45 minutes. Another thing of note is the color undertones you get with the different denims. The true blue denims stayed within the cool hues even in the most bleached swatches, while the blue/black denim in the middle starts to take on a yellow tint as it gets lighter. I don’t necessarily prefer one to the other, but it is something to think about.

DISTRESSING YOUR DENIM

Now that the swatches are all bleached it’s time to play with distressing the denims. I grabbed three different weights of sandpaper from my garage – 60, 120 and 300 grit. The 60 is the more coarse sandpaper while the 300 is more fine. I thought I would prefer the 300 but was surprised that I actually liked the 60 the best. I just found that the sandpaper really began to pill the fabric so the fewer swipes the better. The 60 grit did the job right away.


I havn’t tried the distressing with topstitching yet but I was told that you shouldn’t let the sandpaper touch the topstitching at all. This makes sense of course because it will destroy the thread. This may be a little tricky since I plan to bleach and distress once my garments are all sewn up, but I am guessing I will just have to be super careful.

I did find out right away that the softer denim with the most amount of spandex could not handle the distressing. It just ate the fabric. But both of the cone mill denims with minimal spandex worked great. I am assuming an all cotton, no stretch denim would work even better.

I absolutely love the way both the bleaching and distressing turned out. I realize it weakens the fabric so I need to be careful, but it gives such a beautiful, lived in look that I can’t wait to try it on actual clothing. My plan for now is to go with a bleach time in the 30 – 45 min range, knowing that the fabric will naturally get lighter and more distressed over time with wear. I am hoping to get to sewing up the clothing some time in May or June and will post more about it then.

SEWING FOR KIDS TUTORIALS

HUDSON ALTERNATIVE DRAWSTRING METHODS

March 8, 2019

After sewing up hundreds of Hudson pants since it’s release, I have come up with a couple of alternative methods for sewing up the waistband / drawstring which make for a faster sew. This method works for all versions of the Hudson patterns, although I find it especially helpful for the kids Hudson pant pattern and here is why. I love the look of a drawstring for finishing the pant, but it is not very functional for a child, especially those who are on the younger side. Not only do those draw strings get pulled out and lost, but they can be a real struggle for those who cannot tie bows yet, but need to use the bathroom by themselves at school. So, instead of doing a full drawstring as the instructions suggest, I have come up with these two quick methods that give me the look I want without the headache of the actual drawstring.

Method 1 – This method is as simple as sewing up the pants as normal but omitting the buttonholes. I still like to do the stretch topstitching on the waistband for the look and also to keep the elastic from twisting in the wash, but that is optional. This method is especially good for those who are scared of sewing buttonholes. Once you have the pants prepped you also want to take a small piece of drawstring, tie a bow to the size you want, and finish the ends of the drawstring so that they don’t unravel.

Now it’s as simple as centering the bow on center front and then sewing back and forth on either side of the knot. If you are using a matching thread you won’t even be able to see the stitching and no one will know that it is a faux drawstring. Make sure that you are sewing through all parts of the bow on the sides of the middle knot to make sure it doesn’t untie.

That is it for method 1. This is honestly what I use the most for my kids Hudsons because it’s easy and gets the job done.

Method 2 – If you want to take it a step further and are not scared of buttonholes, you may want to try method 2. It’s a bit more involved than method 1 but still easy and creates the look of the drawstring without the ability for it to get pulled out.

You are going to sew up your Hudsons just like the pattern suggests including sewing and opening your buttonholes.

Then you will need to two separate pieces of drawstring with one end of each finished. The raw ends will be inserted into the buttonholes.

Take each raw end and insert into each buttonhole by about 1/2″. The 1/2″ should be pointing away from center front, inside of the waistband. Stitch back and forth several times, just to the outside of the buttonhole, catching the 1/2″ in the stitching the secure.

It should look like the drawstring is in the entire waistband, while actually it is only in the front.

Tie the two drawstring pieces into a bow and you are good to go!

I hope you found these two methods helpful for the next time you sew up some Hudsons!

MAKES SEWING TUTORIALS

BODY CON MIDDI NIKKO DRESS TUTORIAL

September 28, 2018

 

The original Nikko pattern includes pattern pieces for a top (with or without sleeves) that is fitted, and a dress that is straighter through the waist and hips. I wanted to combine the two for a Nikko dress that is more body con like the top is. It’s a very easy hack so I thought I would share.

First of all you will use the top pattern pieces instead of the dress one since it has the more fitted waistline. I decided to use the sleeved version, but this would just as easily work for the sleeveless one. The only pattern pieces that you will be adjusting is the front and back. The neckband and also the sleeves or sleeve facings stay the same.

All you are going to do is lengthen the center front and center back straight down as those are cut on the fold. For the side seams you want to gradually angle it in about an inch so that it is fitted at mid calf. How long you extend it is up to you, but I would say somewhere between 20-30 inches from the original hem.

Once you have cut and sewn the Nikko according the the instructions, I find it really helpful to try the dress on inside out and mark any areas that I want to pull in a bit and make adjustments. I then hemmed it using fusible knit tape like the pattern suggests. Because the pattern calls for really stretchy knits you don’t actually need a slit at the hem, just make sure that you use a very forgiving stretch stitch to finish it.

Let’s talk a bit about fabric. I used a thick ribknit from The Fabric Store for this. I think that the thickness really is key to a body con dress so that it has more coverage. Rib knits are especially good for this. They kind of hide any lines or bumps that you may not want to draw attention to.

That’s it! Super easy hack for a fun dress. Can’t wait to wear it for date night.