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PATTERNMAKING SEWALONG SEWING

LANDER SEWALONG DAY 3 – DARTS AND POCKETS

September 20, 2017

I am super excited to get started today on actually sewing up our Lander Pants and Shorts. If you havn’t done so already, go ahead and cut out all of your pattern pieces from your fabric. Make sure that you also transfer all marking from your pattern pieces to your fabric. There are quite a few ways to do this. Generally I just make a small snip for all notches and use my Chalk pen for everything else. It keeps it simple. The darts should be marked on the wrong side our your fabric, and the back pocket markings should be marked on the right side of your fabric.

OK, let’s get going.

Step 1 – Fuse your interfacing to the wrong side of the curved edge of the front pocket pieces, the waistband, and the left fly. Make sure that your fly looks like the diagram in your instructions with the interfacing facing up. Otherwise you might fuse it to the wrong side of the fly and then the left fly will be backwards.

 

Step 2 – Before sewing, make sure that you have the correct needle in your sewing machine. Especially if your fabric is on the heavier side, you are going to want to use a heavy duty or even a jeans sewing machine needle. It will really make a difference when you are sewing through multiple layers of fabric.

Sew the darts on both back pieces and press the excess in towards center back. I really like using a tailor’s ham when I press darts because it supports the bulge that you just sewed. You can also use a rolled up towel.

 

Step 3 – Prepare your back pockets by folding the top down by 1/4”, wrong sides touching, and pressing.

Take the pressed edge and fold it again, right sides touching, at the two notches. Pin and press.

 

Step 4 – Starting at the top folded edge, backstitch and sew down one side of the pocket at 1/2” seam allowance. Once you get to the bottom corner, leave the needle down and pivot to sew along the bottom of the pocket, pivot again and sew up the other side. Backstitch at the end.

I know it is hard to make out in my navy fabric so here is a closeup of the top corner.

Clip the top corners to reduce bulk and flip the folded area right side out.

Once you turn the top, the two sides will begin folding in as well. Press each of the two side edges and bottom in at 1/2”, using the stitch line as a guide.

 

Step 5 – Make sure that the folded section on the top of the pocket is an even width and that each corner has a nice point. Pin and press. Edgestitch 1/8” from the fold.

Step 6 – Pin the side and bottom edges of the pockets to the back pant pieces where the markings indicate.

Judge me if you will, but I really like using a gluestick for this step. You can get fabric gluesticks or be like me and steal your kids washable gluestick from their art box. (I am going to edgestitch like the instructions tell you to do here, but I actually recommend that you baste the edges at this time and do the final edgestitching once you can try your pants on to make sure that you like the placement of the pockets). Edgestitch around the sides and bottom at 1/8”, backstitching at the beginning and end. Set your back pant pieces aside for now.

 

Step 7 – Trim about 1/16” off of the curved edge and two straight interior edges of the front pocket lining pieces. This will help the lining to roll to the inside after stitching, making sure it is not visible on the finished garment.

 

 

Step 8 – With right sides touching, pin the curved edge, and the two straight interior edges of each front pocket to its coordinating pocket lining. Since the lining is a bit smaller, the main pocket will bubble a bit. Don’t worry about that.

Stitch. Leave the top and outside edges unstitched. Don’t worry if it’s still pulling a bit at this time. Once turned right side out it will be fine.

 

Step 9 – Trim the stitched seams to reduce bulk. Clip the corner and curved edge so that they turn well.

Turn the pockets right side out and press. The lining should not be visible from the right side.

If you are still having problems with the lining being visible, you can pinch a bit of the lining out using a straight pin and then press. It will leave some extra fabric in the lining, but once it is all stitched down you won’t notice at all. It’s more important that you don’t see the lining on the front of the garment.

Edgestitch the curved edge of each front pocket at 1/4”. Press.

 

Step 10 – Pin the pockets to the fronts, matching notches.

Edgestitch around the two straight edges of the front pockets at 1/8”.

Increase your stitch length and baste the top and side of the pockets to the front pant just to make it easier when assembling the rest of the pant or short.

 

OK, that’s it for today. Lot’s of fun progress already. I hope you are loving how they turn out. Comment or email me with questions and tomorrow we will pick up where we left off and we will tackle the crotch and fly.

 

PATTERNMAKING SEWALONG SEWING

LANDER SEWALONG DAY 1 – PRINTING & ASSEMBLING YOUR PATTERN

September 18, 2017

Hands down the most frequent email I get is about printing pdf patterns. I know that for some of you this is redundant, but indie sewing has come a long way in the four years I have been doing this, so I figured it was time for a refresher.

Download and Unzip

The first thing to remember when downloading your pattern is to do so on a computer and not a phone or ipad. I know that you may have been able to do so with other pattern designers, but all True Bias patterns are zipped and ipads and phones are not able to open zipped files. And if you try you will likely run out of your downloads. Once you are at a computer, download the pattern to a safe place (I like dropbox myself). If you don’t know where the file downloaded to you can always search your computer for “True Bias” and you should be able to find it. Next you need to unzip or extract the file. Once you do you will have a folder with all of the files in it.

Making Sense of the Files

Now that you have all of the files in front of you, what do they all mean? Let’s go through them all.

Instructions

First you will look for the one with Instructions in the title. This is going to have all of the sizing, fabric layouts, and step by step instructions for sewing the pattern. It is set up to be printed on 8 1/2″ x 11″ paper on your home printer, but a lot of people choose to save on ink and just keep this on their computer, or email it to yourself so you can access it on your ipad or phone.

Copy Shop – A0 or US

Next look for the files labeled Copy Shop. These patterns are for those of you who do not want to tape together the pattern at home and want to send it to a copy shop so that it’s printed on one large sheet. There are two different types of Copy Shop files to choose from. If you are in the US use the US Copyshop files which will fit on the standard 36″ width of commercial printers and will be delivered in one long sheet. You can send it to Kinkos or Staples or your local print shop. Although if you have a week to wait for shipping, I highly recommend using PDF plotting. I put an order in with them every month or two for the next few projects I work on and it’s much cheaper than the alternative. Cashmerette has a great blog post on sending out Copy Shop files you should check out. I’ve also learned recently the Pattern Review will make print on demand Copy Shop files. Check out this post for more information.

If you are out of the US and your local printers use AO sizing then pick the AO Copy shop files. Just like the US version, you can send it to your local printer of choice. The files will fit into the standard 841mm x 1189mm size. Depending on the pattern these either come as one sheet or may come as multiple AO sized sheets that need to be taped along the top and bottom edges.

If you want to know the size of a Copy Shop pattern you can open it in Adobe Reader and move your cursor to the bottom left hand corner. The dimensions will pop up. You will need this when using an online printer so that you know what size paper to print it on.

For the Lander pant and short pattern, the Copy Shop files are divided into shorts (View A) or pants (Views B and C). You can print just one if you think you will sew only that view.

Since the Copy Shop files can be pricey, a lot of sewists choose to trace their pattern pieces at this point. This allows you to use the pattern again at a future date if you want to make another size or make adjustments.

Print at Home

The last option is the Print at Home Pattern. Use this if you want to print and assemble the pattern yourself. It is certainly the cheapest way to go. Yes, it takes some extra time, but I personally love being able to reprint the pattern if needed to down the line. And it’s pretty simple to do it once you get the hang of it.

Open the Print at Home file in Adobe Reader (it’s very reliable and free!). File -> Print. Your settings should look something like this.

My patterns are all black and white so you can check Print in Grayscale. Next, under pages to print, check All. Continuing down, under Paper and Sizing check Actual Size. This is very important. If you tell it to fit, it will make your whole pattern too small. Lastly, under Orientation you can leave it on Auto. Now you can print.

Tip: It’s not a bad idea to print off the first page by itself, measure the 3 x 3 inch square, and make sure everything is correct before printing the entire pattern.

Assembling Your Print at Home Pattern

If you chose to print your pdf pattern at home, you will need to print and assemble it. There are lots of ways you can do this, but here is the method that works for me. I take 5 pieces of paper at a time and trim the top and right sides off only.

If you don’t have a paper cutter you can do so with scissors, but if you think you will be assembling a lot of pdf patterns in your future, I highly recommend getting one.

Next, assemble the first row by by overlapping the the trimmed right edge of one piece of paper over the untrimmed left edge of the next piece.

You need to line up the gray circles and tape in place.

Once you make an entire row, set it aside and do the same thing to the next row.

Now tape the trimmed top edge of the second row over the untrimmed bottom of the first row. Match up those circles and tape into place. Continue to do this for the entire pattern until it is all assembled.

Every once in awhile you may find that something is off by 1/32″ here or there. That is inevitable. It may be an error when cutting or it might just be that your printer interpreted a line a bit differently than intended. Please don’t fret about it. That small amount of difference will not change the outcome of your finished garment. Instead, just interpret where the lines connect accurately and keep going. I promise it will be fine.

 

When choosing which size to cut out, refer to the sizing guide below or on your instructions.

Measure your full hip and natural waist (smallest part of your waist at the bellybutton). There is a bit of wiggle room in the hip (the seam allowances on the side seams are extra wide and there is a step in the instructions to baste and then adjust the fit of the side seams), but the waist measurement needs to be pretty close to accurate. If you need to grade between sizes or you think you will need to make other adjustments, wait to cut our your pattern pieces.

Tomorrow we will be covering the most common fit issues and how to solve them. In the meantime, if you need to purchase the Lander Pant and Short sewing pattern, you can do so here.

PATTERNMAKING SEWALONG SEWING

LANDER PANT / SHORT READY-TO-WEAR INSPIRATION

September 11, 2017

I am blown away by your response to the Lander pant and short sewing pattern. I am so happy that you like it as much as I do and I can’t wait to sew along with so many of you next week during the Lander pant and short sewalong. This week, however, I wanted to share some ready-to-wear inspiration as well as some fabric ideas. Today I will share the inspiration and in a couple of days I will be back with fabric and notions so you will be ready to start on Monday.

Since the 70sis having such a huge comeback right now, there is lots of fun wide legged, high-waisted inspiration to choose from. Whether you choose to use linen, jean, corduroy, or twill (to name just a few), it will completely change the feel of the final garment. You can also use jeans buttons for a more polished finish or regular buttons for something a little more nautical and casual. I’ve broken the inspiration into each View. I hope it gives you some great ideas for your own version!

 

View A (short length) – I am pretty obsessed with the shorts version of this pattern. The 4 inch inseam is a perfect length to not feel booty short, but also not matronly. It balances nicely with the high length of the waist and you can easily roll up the hem if that is your preference. I found myself reaching for these all summer long because it felt like a great way to feel casual, yet stylish. I would often pair it with an oversized buttonup and tuck it into just the front.

 

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

 

View B (ankle length) – The ankle length pant is everywhere right now. It feels so fresh and on trend. I love pairing it with some sneakers for a trip to the park or dress it up with some heels for a date night. I can’t wait to try it with some boots or booties in the fall like number 4 below.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

 

View C (boot length) – The boot length version of this pattern is perfect for the full 70s vibe. It’s dramatic and flattering, creating a beautiful long silhouette from the high waist down to the floor – especially nice for those of us who are on the short side. I can’t wait to try this is a corduroy or jean fabric like number 5. So many possibilities.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

 

The full sewalong starts on Monday (a week from today). You can still get your pattern here if you want to sew along. I’ll be back on Thursday with fabric ideas and notions.

PATTERNMAKING SEWING

LANDER PANT & SHORT – NEW SEWING PATTERN

September 7, 2017

I am so excited to finally show you all my newest pattern – the Lander Pant and Short. This pattern is high-waisted, with an exposed button fly, and 3 lengths. It has front and back patch pockets, belt loops, and a straight fit through the legs. View A is a short with a 4” inseam, View B is an ankle length pant, and View C is a boot length pant that can be worn with heels.  It has a difficulty rating of 3.5 out of 5, but with the sewalong coming in just a couple of weeks I am certain that any confident sewist could handle it.

The idea for this pattern came from my favorite thrifted boy scout shorts that I wore all through high school. Since I no longer have them I decided I needed to recreate them to my best memory. This pattern is everything good I remember from the shorts – high waisted 70’s vibe, brass buttons, large patch pockets, but updated to be a bit more modern and flattering. I have been wearing them all summer and they are so versatile. They were perfect for our summer vacation to Yellowstone where I wanted to be comfy and practical, but not sloppy. They are equally great with a heel or wedge for a more sleek, going out look.

The Landers are drafted for woven fabrics with little to no stretch. I made most of my samples in the Robert Kaufman Ventana twill, but any medium to heavyweight woven fabric will do. My testers made them in linen, denim, twill, and corduroy, all with great results. Just keep in mind your machine and how it will deal with multiple layers of heavy fabric when choosing the best fabric for your version. I will be back next week with more fabric recommendations, and tips on notions.

Being our most advanced pattern to date, we will definitely be doing a sewalong. The official sewalong starts on Monday, Sept. 18th so start gathering your supplies now.

You can find the pdf (digital) version of this pattern in the shop here. Use the code LANDERLAUNCH for 20% off of the pdf pattern from now through Sunday night.

If you prefer the paper pattern you can preorder it here (along with 3 other patterns being produced into paper patterns). We are expecting it to be shipped out sometime within the next 6-8 weeks.

PATTERNMAKING SEWING TUTORIALS

CAMP PJ PARTY

October 1, 2016

It’s Camp PJ Party Day. If you don’t know what I am talking about check out all of the details over at Camp Workroom Social. Pretty much anyone who wants to can make a pair of PJs, post them on instagram today, and get an adorable PJ patch of their own from Camp Workroom Social. Super fun right?

For my PJs I made a pair of pocketless Hudson Pants and a Penny Raglan Tee for a super comfy loungy set of PJs that I never want to take off. The fabric is a rayon spandex from Indiesew. It’s the perfect medium weight knit that is not see through at all, but still drapey and soft. The cuffs, waistband, and neckline were done in a coordinating ribbing from JoAnns.

I wanted to make pocketless Hudsons for the bottoms to take a bit of the bulk out for comfort. I’ve been seeing a lot of this style in ready to wear stores lately. It’s a bit more of a long john style that is perfect for sleepwear. Altering your pattern for pocketless is super simple. All you do is take the main pocket piece and line up the side and top notches with the front piece. Take it together and that becomes your new front piece. You won’t need the inner pocket pattern piece or the pocket detail. Then you just sew it up like normal, eliminating the steps for the pocket. It’s an even faster sew after that.

The top is the Penny Raglan from Grainline Studio. I love the oversized, off the shoulder feel to this top. I made up another one as an oversized tee to wear with workout pants and a sports bra and I love it too. The only change I made to this top is to lengthen it a bit. Not sure if I needed to, but I thought better safe than sorry.

The end result is my new fav PJs. They are SO comfy. I can’t wait to wear them at Camp Workroom Social in just a couple of weeks.