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True Bias

MAKES TUTORIALS

SHELBY LACE BACK HACK

July 3, 2019

I wanted to share a really fun and easy hack for the Shelby dress and Romper. The lace up trend is back in a big way and the Shelby seemed like the perfect pattern to use to try it out.

I am going to be sewing up the dress version but shortening it a bit for more of a middi length. If you decide to go for a middi length in this pattern I do recommend shortening the long views instead of lengthening the short views since the longer views have a bit less width to keep normal fabric widths into account. If you simply lengthen the shorter views the circumference of your pattern pieces will get quite large at the bottom and make them hard to cut out.

For fabric I am using some beautiful rayon challis gifted to me from the online Fabric Store. As of when I am writing this it is still in stock and you can find it here. I love rayon challis for the Shelby because of it’s great drape and this fun print is large scale which is hard to find.

The first thing to take into account when cutting out your Shelby is that your ties will be one long tie instead of two. You simply place the pattern piece on a fold at the short end and cut out one long tie. Sew it up according to the normal instructions.

Next, you need to cut out two strips of fabric which will become your loops. Cut two 1.25″ x 18″ strips of fabric.

With right sides touching, sew them up with a 3/8″ seam allowance.

Trim the seam allowance to about 1/8″ and turn right side out using a loop turner or small safety pin.

Press your tubes flat.

Get your center back piece. I am sewing up a dress view so it’s on the fold but if you are sewing up a romper view, make sure it is already sewn up along the center back.

You should already have one set of markings for the original tie placement. We are going to use those markings and add two more sets above the original. You could add more if you wanted.

I decided to place my markings for loop placement 2 1/2″ apart. You can have them closer or further according to your preference.

These markings are for the center points of your loops. Make another set of markings 1 inch out from the cut edge, at each loop marking. This second marking is for the turn of each loop should hit.

Pin generously so that the tube is centered over the markings with about 1/4″ on each side and turning at the second 1″ marking.

Once you feel confident that they all evenly looped, baste in place at 1/2″ seam allowance.

If all still looks good, sew the side back to the center back, sandwiching the loops inbetween.

Trim loop seam allowance.

Finish seam allowance in your desired manner and press seam allowances towards side back.

Repeat for other side until you have matching loops on both sides.

To lace up the loops, pull the long tie through the loops so that it is centered along the top two loops.

Continue to lace it up just like a sneaker and tie in a bow at the bottom.

Sew the rest of the garment up according to your instructions.

I love how mine turned out! You can find the Shelby pattern here.

ON MY MIND OTHER TUTORIALS

FABRIC STASH ORGANIZATION

July 1, 2019

Last week I talked on instagram stories about my stash and my unsuccessful attempt at organizing it. For years I have been folding and storing all of my stash fabric (which I embarassingly have way too much of) in bins tucked under my cutting table. The problem is that although it was nice and safe in there, I never remembered what I had so I would buy more and more. I also couldn’t easily locate fabric when I needed it. Enough was enough so I decided to take everything out of my bins, organize it, donate the fabric I was never going to sew, (I was able to donate it to my local library for their creative space) and get all of the stash fabric organized onto shelves. I started using the rolling method because I had heard it was easier to see your fabric, but as I kept going I realized it was way too messy for my liking.

They I shared it on instagram and a bunch of you replied that you used the comic board method. I had never heard of this method before so I went to youtube where I found this great instructional video from Sew Sweetness. I was immediately hooked and decided to change my methods. The only issue I anticipated was that all of the tutorials I found were geared towards quilting and therefore 44 inch wide stable cotton fabrics. Most of my stash consists of 54-60 inch wide apparel fabrics. Some of them are super thick, others are slippery, and most are in 2-5 yard cuts. So I wanted bigger boards right off the bat.

Instead of the smaller comic book boards, I went with these 8.5 x 11 inch magazine boards. This little bit of extra size gives just enough extra room to help with my wider fabric. They also happened to fit the height of my Ikea shelves better. This is definitely something I would consider when choosing the size of the boards you use. Magazine boards are kinda like a thick cardstock, pretty inexpensive, and most importantly are acid free. This is something I would highly recommend thinking about because you do not want the cardboard you are using to damage your fabric if it stays on there for a long time.

I also ordered these clear plastic alligator clips which come in a big package and are pretty cheap. I do wish that they had bigger ones for the thicker fabrics in my stash and I am still on the lookout for those. So far I have only found metal ones that are bigger and I don’t feel comfortable using metal on my fabric in case it rusts. I know a lot of shops also use T pins which are a great option if you are not worried about rust or the pin damaging your fabric. I decided to stick with the clear plastic ones and make them work.

Now that you know what I am using, here is the step by step of how I folded my fabric. Keep in mind that I am no perfectionist when it comes to folding these. I always wash and dry my fabric right after buying it so I am left with some wrinkly fabric and frayed ends. This doesn’t bother me at all. You could certainly go the extra mile and iron your fabric before folding but personally I think this makes the whole process too long and more of a hassle. That’s just me though.

For this demo I am using 2 yards of denim that is 60 inches wide. For each cut of fabric you need one board and two alligator clips.

Start by folding your fabric lengthwise with selvages touching. I choose to have the right side of the fabric out so that it’s easier to see the fabric for what it is on the shelf, but that is up to you.

Take your magazine board and place it in the middle of the fabric between the selvages and the fold and about 5 inches in from the cut edge.

Fold down the top selvage edges over the magazine board. Make sure to continue the fold all of the way down the length of the fabric (2 yards in my case). This can get a little tricky if you have more yardage. On my rayons when I had 4 yards I folded the whole thing in half widthwise so it was like I was dealing with 2 yards wide.

Fold up the bottom folded edge over the magazine board. Make sure to continue the fold all of the way down the length of the fabric (2 yards in my case).

Fold in the 5 inches to the left of the magazine board.

Flip the magazine board with the fabric over and over until you get close to the end of your yardage. Keep it nice and tight.

Fold in the cut edges at the end of your yardage so that they are not hanging out.

Now fold this last fold in so that everything is nice and neat.

Take your alligator clips and slide them into the second two layers of fabric up against the last fold you made. This will hold your fabric tight on the roll without having to expand the small alligator clip too much.

That is it! I am so excited about how nice and neat it looks.

They stack perfectly on my shelf and keep it looking tidy, while still allowing me to see all of my fabric. I love it so much.

Folding all of my stash only took a few hours, cost about $30 US and was weirdly relaxing. I am hooked. It is how I plan to organize my fabric stash from here on out. I hope this was helpful for you as well.

Some of the links above are affiliate links which means that at no additional cost to you, I receive a commission if you click through and make a purchase. All opinions are honest and my own.

MAKES SEWING

ZADIE JUMPSUITS

June 6, 2019

Like just about everyone else in the sewing community, I fell hard for the Zadie Jumpsuit by Paper Theory Patterns. I’ve made three in all and am trying to not give in to making a fourth. It’s that good.

I think the thing I like the most about the Zadie Jumpsuit is how easy it is to wear. I find that it truly is one of those items that you can dress up or down. I keep grabbing them every time I travel along with flats for daytime and wedges / statement jewelry for going out at night.

This first version is sewn up in a black cupro rayon / linen blend from Blackbird Fabrics. I am loving cupro right now because it has a nice expensive sheen to it, but with the ease of care and simple sewing of a linen.

I did have to make quite a few adjustments to the pattern. I sized down one whole size and still ended up taking some width out of the hips. I also took an inch out of the bodice length, and inch out of the rise and and inch out of the pant length. I am 5’3″ so that is not surprising.

This second version is sewn up in some rayon crepe gifted to me from The Fabric Store. It has a deconstructed dot pattern that feels a little hand drawn which I love.

Rayon crepe is one of my favorite fabrics to sew with right now. It has a great weight to it which adds a bit of drama, but it is still easy to sew and take care of. They have a lot great rayon crepes right which are worth checking out.

For the shorts version all I did was was shorten the pattern to about the knee, and then once I was finished sewing the rest of the pattern I tried it on. Then I marked where I wanted it hemmed all the way around the leg and was able to shorten it evenly that way.

I love the way that my Zadies turned out and love wearing them. You can find the pattern at Paper Theory if you want to sew one up for yourself.

MAKES SEWALONG SEWING

FINISHED SHELBYS FROM SEWALONG

June 4, 2019

I hope you all found the Shelby Sewalong from last week helpful. I was able to find some time to get those two Shelbys photographed and wanted to show them to you.

This first Shelby is View A with the traditional longer sleeve. I used some beautiful rayon crepe from the Sewing Studio in Oregon.

I love the burnt orange color and large scale floral design.

The second Shelby is View C, the short romper, with the shorter cap sleeve.

I sewed this version up in a small daisy print that I bought from Blackbird Fabrics.

I’ve surprised myself with how much I am gravitating towards ditsy flower prints for the Shelby. The 90s flare of the design really lends itself to these types of fabric in my opinion.

That’s it. Super simple post. If you want to purchase the Shelby Dress and Romper pattern for yourself you can do so here.

SEWALONG SEWING

SHELBY SEWALONG DAY 5 – HEMMING AND BUTTONS

June 1, 2019

It’s here, the last day of the sewalong! Not a lot to do today, just buttons and hems.

The first few steps are for hemming the dress versions, if you are sewing up the romper, skip ahead to step 32.

Step 31 – With right sides touching, turn the bottom edge of the facing to the outside along the seam where the facing and dress meet, with lower raw edges even. Pin.

Stitch along bottom edge at a 5/8″ seam allowance for the length of the facing. Backstitch at both ends.

Clip corners.

On the inside of the dress, fold the bottom raw edge up by 1/4″, wrong sides touching, all the way around, including the area attached to the facing. (You are not folding up the bottom of the facing.) Press.

Turn facing right side out, turning out corner into a nice point. This will begin to fold the hem by an additional 3/8″.

Pin and press. The folded lower edge of the dress should align with the seam at the lower edge of the facing.

Stitch close to fold to secure hem, starting and stopping at edge of facing. Backstitch.

The next step is for the romper views only. If you sewing the dress, skip ahead to step 33.

Step 32 – Fold the bottom raw edge of each romper leg up by 1/4″, wrong sides touching. Press.

Fold again by 3/8″. Continue to fold up the entire hem by 3/8″. Press and pin.

Stitch close to the fold to secure.

Step 33 – Using the buttonhole placement guide, mark buttonholes on the right (when wearing) front. Note that Views A and B use seven buttons / buttonholes, while Views C and D only use five. Also keep in mind, if you shortened or lengthened the garment at all you will need to adjust the button placement and may need to add or subtract buttons. Just make sure they are equal distance apart.

I use a disappearing marker to mark by buttonhole placement.

Stitch buttonholes. I like to add fray check to my buttonholes next and let them dry before opening them.

Open your buttonholes. I use a buttonhole opener but you can use a small pair of scissors too.

Line up the centers of your garment. Mark button placement through open buttonholes on left front.

Sew buttons onto the left front.

Congrats! You are finished. Give the dress or romper a good press and you are good to go.

I hope you have found the Shelby Sewalong helpful. Be sure to tag us with your makes so we can see them!